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Delegate Social Media to a Teenager?

You’re busy. You’ve got clients calling at all hours and deadlines you’ve got to meet.

You’re also reading articles here and on other sites about the importance of social media. You feel pressure to get involved with Facebook and Twitter.

You’ve got a teenager who understands social media (and not much else as far as you can tell).

Why not hire your kid to do the social media for you?

It’s very tempting to let the teenager tweet for you, update your Facebook status, and keep up with your Facebook page.

Should you?

No.

Don’t do it.

It’s a bad idea.

Why?

Because social media is about connecting with other people. It’s about engaging with others and building relationships.

Social media is a conversation. It’s you talking to real people and those people talking to you. It’s a conversation.

The conversation between you and prospective clients or between you and referral sources needs a critical element on your side of the conversation. It needs you.

Without you, your social media participation isn’t going to work. It’s a seriously bad idea that’s likely to cause you more harm than good.

If you don’t have time for social media, then don’t do it. Don’t worry about it. Just let it go and do what you need to do.

You’re better off skipping social media than delegating it to someone else. Delegating social media is like delegating your attendance at a family reunion. It’s not going to work.

Social media isn’t for everyone. It’s not part of every marketing plan. Your practice can succeed without social media if you generate business in other ways.

If you’re going to get involved in Facebook, Twitter, and other platforms, then do it yourself. If you’re not going to do it yourself, then just don’t do it.

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Lee Rosen

Lee Rosen has practiced family law for more than twenty years. With four offices, Rosen Law Firm serves Raleigh, Charlotte, Durham and Chapel Hill, North Carolina. Rosen served as the Law Practice Management Editor of the ABA Family Advocate for more than a decade and received the ABA James Keane Award for excellence in eLawyering. He served as Chair of the Law Practice Management Section of the North Carolina Bar Association, is a frequent speaker and is often sought out by the media as a source of family law insight and commentary.